• FR
  • The mighty Canadian Federation of Independent Business now a partner of “Well Made Here”

    Thanks to a new partnership with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), beginning May 1, 2022, all eligible manufacturers and buying groups that are part of “Well Made Here” (WMH) have access to services, advice and savings programs from the largest employer group in the country. The political positioning effort pursued by WMH management will also be facilitated through membership with this organization which already represents 95,000 SMEs.

     

    In fact, all businesses incorporated in Canada that are members in good standing with WMH now have access to CFIB benefits which are divided into five categories:

    Complimentary and unlimited access to bilingual business advisors, who can assist with business management issues

    1. a wide selection of complimentary customizable templates, mainly for human resources management as well for compliance to a host of regulations, with telephone support for proper use of these tools
    2. free expert-led webinars covering business essential topics
    3. free continuing education programs via the VuBiz platform, some aimed at employers, others more at employees;
    4. savings programs for service provider costs such as card payment processing, payroll processing, fire, accident and casualty insurance (including legal assistance), courier/shipping services, group insurance, etc.

    If it were to leverage solely the discounts negotiated with suppliers selected by the CFIB according to rigorous criteria a business could save up to $5,000 per year.

    How do you take advantage of the offer?

    This week, the CFIB will send out a welcome email containing the CFIB membership number that will allow you to access all the services of your new membership.

    Note that if you are already a CFIB member, your representative will adjust your rate as follows: $20 per month and zero fees per employee.

     

     

    A bit of history

    It all started in a bathtub. Soaking casually in his bath on a mild evening in 1969, John Bulloch, a professor at Ryerson Polytechnic Institute, read a white paper on taxation recently published by the federal government. The hot water and bubble bath drastically lost their calming effect: Bulloch was furious. He had just learned that the federal government was preparing to raise the tax rate for Canadian SMEs to 50%. The government had exempted big business from its proposals and intended to leave it to Canadian SMEs to foot the bill. The notion was unbearable to him. Without any hesitation, he wrote to the Minister of Finance denouncing the White Paper and ensured that his letter was published in the newspaper as part of an ad. No one anticipated that the ad would spark a wave of support that swept across the country. It is in the enthusiastic wake of the revolt of thousands of entrepreneurs that Bulloch and his friends created a protest group and launched a hefty campaign in opposition to the White Paper. The campaign resulted in a big victory that convinced John Bulloch that small and medium-sized businesses should be better represented.

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